Tóg an duilleog

Grab the leaf

Organic
& you

It’s easier than you think to buy organic produce. Learn how to make the move. Irish Organic, Good for People, Good for the Planet.

Watch
the campaign

Wake Up To Organic Oats
Discover This is Irish Organic

The EU Organic Leaf bringing forth what once was rogue. Irish Organic, Good for You, Good for the Planet.

Tóg an Duilleog | Grab the leaf

Irish Organic Meat, Naturally a Cut Above
Discover This is Irish Organic

The EU Organic Leaf looks after thee. Irish Organic, Naturally Reared, Naturally Delicious.

Tóg an Duilleog | Grab the leaf

Organic Eggs, Naturally Different
Discover This is Irish Organic

In lands rich with nature’s bounty there’s an EU Organic leaf for every county. Irish Organic, Good for Nature, Good for You.

Tóg an Duilleog | Grab the leaf

5 Reasons to
Buy Organic Food

Healthy for people and the planet

Organic farmers and growers rely on healthy ecosystems to produce your food, from the health of the soil and the crops, to the health of the animals and farmers themselves.

Supporting Nature

Organic farming is designed to respect nature and to enhance the health of our soils, water and air, leading to healthier farmed landscapes and more biodiversity above and below the ground.

Favourable for the Climate

Organic farms do not use manufactured synthetic fertilisers and pesticides, which come from burning fossil fuels and therefore actively help to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

Animal Friendly

Ensuring all animals reared for meat and other animal products have a good life is at the heart of organic farming, with plenty of space and fresh air to be truly free to range and express their natural behaviour.

Naturally Delicious

Organic production is designed to focus on diversity and the food’s own taste and nutritional value without the use of synthetic inputs on farm, or artificial colours, flavours or enhancers when produce is processed.

Recognise
Organic Food (EU Leaf)

  • The EU organic logo (the EU leaf) makes it easier for you to recognise organic produce. It combines the official flag of the EU and a leaf to symbolise nature and sustainability to identify organic products.
  • Whether you are in a supermarket or at your local organic retailer or farmers’ market and see the EU leaf with the twelve stars on a food or drink product you can be assured it is organic.
  • This guarantees that what you are buying is produced using organic production methods that are good for people and animals as well as biodiversity and the climate.
  • The word ‘organic’ is also legally protected in Ireland and across the entire EU. Farmers and food processors must be certified organic to use the word on their products.

The EU organic logo can only be used on products that have been certified as organic by an authorised organic control body.

  • This ensures the product meets the EU’s legal requirements for organic production and has been checked and verified from the farm to retailer or business.
  • Organic products can also indicate if the produce has been farmed in Ireland or Northern Ireland by using the term ‘Ireland Agriculture’ or ‘Northern Ireland Agriculture’.

Range of
Irish Organic Produce

Whether it is local and seasonal Irish organic carrots, potatoes, tomatoes and salad to think of a few organic growers aim to sustain healthy living soils and positive plant health as they grow organic produce for you and yours. Here are just some of the things that happen on organic horticulture farms to support good food and good farming.

  • Soil health is fostered through the recycling of organic manures, with plants such as clover and other green manures used to support a diverse range of crops, rather than using energy-hungry synthetic fertilisers
  • Neither herbicides nor synthetic pesticides are used in organic production, which protects biodiversity both above and below the ground, from pollinators and wildlife to earthworms and other soil life
  • Organic plant health relies on practices such as crop rotation, crop variety selection and sequencing, companion cropping, and manual weeding to protect against pests and diseases
  • Physical barriers such as covers and netting, and beneficial predators are used to manage pests in speciality crops, with naturally occurring pesticides such as garlic oil used to repel carrot flies only used as a last resort
  • Organic crops are grown using seeds adapted for organic conditions and are not from genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

Whether it is Irish organic milk, yoghurt, cheese or eggs, organic farmers aim to sustain a healthy living soil, and positive plant and animal health as they rear organic produce for you and yours. Here are just some of the things that happen on organic dairy and poultry farms to support good food and good farming.

  • Animals are truly free to range and must have plenty of space and fresh air, whether indoors or outdoors, to move freely and express their natural behaviour
  • Livestock must have access to pasture in balance with the carrying capacity of the land (when weather and ground conditions permit) and bedded housing when inside from the winter elements
  • Soil health is fostered through organic manure recycling and crop rotation, with plants such as clover supporting future crop development. No energy-hungry synthetic fertilisers and pesticides are permitted
  • All animals are fed an organic diet, grown on farm or other certified organic farms and free from synthetic pesticides and genetically modified organisms (GMOs)
  • Routine antibiotics and wormer use is prohibited which helps minimise antimicrobial resistance and maintains treatment effectiveness, with the focus on prevention and treating animals only if they are sick.

Whether it is Irish organic beef, lamb or poultry, organic farmers aim to sustain healthy living soils, and positive plant and animal health as they rear organic produce for you and yours. Here are just some of the things that happen on these organic livestock farms to support good food and good farming:

  • Animals are truly free to range and must have plenty of space and fresh air whether indoors or outdoors to move freely and express their natural behaviour
  • Livestock must have access to pasture in balance with the carrying capacity of the land (when weather and ground conditions permit) and bedded housing when inside from the winter elements
  • Soil health is fostered through organic manure recycling and crop rotation, with plants such as clover supporting future crop development. No energy-hungry synthetic fertilisers and pesticides are permitted
  • All animals are fed an organic diet, grown on farm or on other certified organic farms and free from synthetic pesticides and genetically modified organisms (GMOs)
  • Routine antibiotics and wormer use is prohibited which helps minimise antimicrobial resistance and maintains treatment effectiveness, with the focus on prevention and treating animals only if they are sick.

Whether it is Irish organic oats for breakfast, wheat for organic flour making or barley and peas to feed organic animals (they eat organic too), organic farmers aim to sustain healthy living soils and positive plant health as they grow organic produce for you and yours. Here are just some of the things that happen on organic tillage farms to support good food and good farming.

  • Soil health is fostered through the recycling of organic manures, with plants such as clover and other green manures used to support a diverse range of crops, rather than using energy-hungry synthetic fertilisers
  • Neither herbicides nor synthetic pesticides are used in organic production, which protects biodiversity both above and below the ground, from pollinators and wildlife to earthworms and other soil life
  • Organic plant health relies on practices such as crop rotation, crop variety selection and sequencing, companion cropping, and manual weeding to protect against pests and diseases
  • Physical barriers such as covers and netting, and beneficial predators are used to manage pests in speciality crops, with naturally occurring pesticides such as garlic oil used to repel carrot flies only used as a last resort
  • Organic crops are grown using seeds adapted for organic conditions and not from genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

FAQs

Organic food is produced using organic production methods based on the organic principles of health, ecology, fairness and care. These are defined and measured by the organic standards covering the entire organic supply chain and are protected by EU law. The words ‘organic’ (or ‘bio’, ‘eco’, or ‘eko’ in the rest of the EU) can only appear a product if complies with the EU organic rules.

Organic production methods aim to produce high-quality products sustainably right across the supply chain, from care for the land, plants and animals, to careful and minimal manufacturing of organic products, to the distribution and retail to you the consumer.

If the EU organic logo (EU Green Leaf) is on a product then you can be guaranteed it has been certified organic whether in Ireland or the rest of the EU to the legally defined rules.

In Ireland and other EU countries all organic operators, from farmers and processers to traders and retailers must be inspected to ensure that they are meeting the organic standards. Inspections are conducted annually by official organic control bodies both announced and unannounced. So if you see the EU organic logo you can be certain it is organic.

No. Organic farm and land management is designed to work with natural processes and cycles, meaning that synthetic fertilisers and pesticides are not used. Instead, farmers use natural methods such as crop rotation, crop selection, and organic manures and compost to support good soil health and crop production. Weed killers are not permitted and where pest control is applied it must be of natural origin and used as a last resort.

Yes. All livestock on an organic farm must comply with the organic rules for raising organic livestock, meaning no synthetic fertilisers and pesticides can be used to produce feed. All feed must be GMO-free. All animal diets therefore must contain organic feed, whether that is the grass or other forage consumed by organic cattle and sheep or the grain consumed by organic pigs and poultry.

Organic livestock must be raised to the highest welfare standards in conditions designed to suit their natural behaviour. For example, organic livestock must have access to pasture and bedded housing when inside from the elements in the winter. As well as ensuring that animals are genuinely free to range, with lower stocking densities, routine use of preventative antibiotics is banned and a greater focus is placed on preventative health management.

The routine use of antibiotics and medicines in organic farming is prohibited, with farmers required to draw up a farm health management plan every year to mitigate disease risks. Organic livestock are only treated with antibiotics as necessary when no other treatment option is available. Organic health management in the first instance relies on prevention rather than cure. Where medical treatment, including antibiotics, is needed to ensure animal health and prevent suffering, it must be administered based on veterinary guidance and authorisation.

There are strict standards involved in the processing of organic products with limited use of additives, processing aids and techniques and no ingredient based on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) permitted. The emphasis of an organic food product should be on its own taste and nutritional value. For example, no artificial colours, flavours or enhancers are permitted. Irradiation as a means of extending shelf life and nanotechnology to manipulate the colour, odour, fluidity or texture of products are also not permitted.

Organic products may often have more nutritional value, many more antioxidants, and fewer synthetic pesticide residues than non-organic products. However, health is considered in the much wider context of organic food and farming systems. This includes the health of the land, the soil, the plant, the animals and the farmers and farm workers themselves. Organic can therefore have positive personal health benefits. At the same time, individual personal health is influenced by many factors such as diet and nutrition, lifestyle, exercise and (hereditary) diseases.

Organic farmers seek to work in the most environmentally friendly and holistic way possible. This includes enhancing nature both above and below the ground, from the promotion of more flora and fauna and crop diversity to building and maintaining healthy and biologically active soils. For example, the prohibition of manufactured synthetic fertilisers and pesticides not only supports more biodiversity but also creates beneficial conditions for protecting our soils and waterways from nutrient pollution and persistent pollutants.

Organic farming is less input-intensive and more energy-efficient and therefore tends to emit fewer greenhouse gases. For example, organic farms do not use synthetic fertilisers and have lower stocking densities, both of which are major contributors to nitrous oxide and methane.  Instead, organic farmers work with natural processes and the capacity of their farmland, relying on clover-rich swards as well as recycled organic farmyard manure to build and maintain soil fertility and plant health. Organic farming practices are also known to lock up more carbon in the soil which helps to slow down climate change.

Tóg an duilleog

Grab the leaf